RSSAuthor Archive for Kevin Delin

Kevin Delin

Kevin Delin took a few writing courses (among other things) at MIT from playwright A.R. Gurney and author Frank Conroy. Unable to convince backers to turn his textbook, Foundations of Applied Superconductivity, into the Broadway spectacular it deserved to be, he has found other ways of making mischief in the entertainment industry. In addition to writing, he uses his extensive tech background and work experience in both Silicon Valley and NASA to advise those who want to ground their entertainment in science. You can follow him on Twitter @KDelin and read his other writings at Script Magazine.

Why We Need Art

Why We Need Art

Occasionally we hear the claim that the first rule of art is to “entertain.” But that’s really not quite correct. The first – and, in fact, only – rule is to “engage.” Once the artist has and holds our attention, he can give us a deep experience that is not quite possible in any other […]

Nipples and Boobs (because Net Neutrality is too boring)

Nipples and Boobs (because Net Neutrality is too boring)

In 2004, Janet Jackson exposed her right nipple on national television.  You can stare at the Sun longer than her nipple was on-screen.  No matter.  The FCC got 1.4 million complaints over this assault on all things American.  The intensity and number of complaints were so great that the FCC stepped up safeguards to prevent […]

Fringe Review:  Friends Like These

Fringe Review: Friends Like These

In 1988, the movie Heathers – a tale about how a couple of misfit high school students take their revenge on the in-crowd by killing them – was billed as a black comedy. The events at Columbine High School 11 years later made that film considerably less funny.  And since Columbine, the number of mass shootings, […]

Fringe Review:  Hamlet Max

Fringe Review: Hamlet Max

Hamlet Max may be co-presented at the 2014 Hollywood Fringe Festival by Schkapf and Sacred Fools Theater, but this is Jacob Sidney’s project all the way. He not only has adapted the material from Shakespeare’s Hamlet but also serves as producer, director, and lead actor. The press materials highlight that the adaptation’s source material is […]

Are You Part of the Digital Revolution?

Are You Part of the Digital Revolution?

Congratulations to both nominees and winners at the LA Weekly Awards last night.  But, more importantly, congratulations to the entire LA theater community.  Why? Because it happened. Look what live tweeting and retweeting wrought: If you find the print too small (even when you click on the image twice to expand it), here’s a blow […]

It Will Take a Village:  #LAThtrAwards

It Will Take a Village: #LAThtrAwards

It’s pretty obvious from even a cursory glance of my Facebook feed that arty, creative people make pretty good activists.  They are passionate about the cause, think about community, and believe they can effect change.  Environmental issues, animal protections, gay rights…  there are so many topics that need tending and I’ve seen people from the […]

A Call to Action:  Using #LAThtrAwards to promote #LAThtr

A Call to Action: Using #LAThtrAwards to promote #LAThtr

In the true spirit of Twitter, I’m about to summarize this entire column in 137 characters.  Ready? People should tweet live from #LAThtrAwards#LAThtrAwards shows to help promote #LAThtr#LAThtr & start with @LAWeekly Awards hosted by @ZombieJoes on April 7. Okay, let’s now flesh out this tweet. Last week I expressed my disappointment when I discovered I couldn’t follow […]

Failure to Communicate

Failure to Communicate

True story:  I once worked in a small tech start-up where the VP of Operations declared at a company meeting:  “We won’t be spending any more money on advertising until our sales increase.” I’ll pause for a moment so you can really appreciate that remark. (Insert sound of my idle humming here.) Back?  Then I’ll […]

Dr. Seuss The Grinch Stole Christmas

How the Critic Panned the Show!

Every Patron In LA Liked Theater a lot… But the Critic Who lived in his head Did NOT! The Critic hated Theater! The whole LA scene! Yet no one was certain why he thought it obscene. It could be he wanted his plays to be gritty Or wanted to see those from just New York […]

handbill distributed in Dallas before Kennedy assassination

Words Can Kill

Earlier this week, the country commemorated the power of words.  Now we reflect, again, on the power of words – but to a different effect. Malcolm X referred to America in 1963 as a “climate of hate.” Here is a handbill passed out in Dallas the day before President Kennedy’s visit. It was authored by […]

There's a Light in the Darkness of Everybody's Life

There’s a Light in the Darkness of Everybody’s Life

Dear Lady-Seated-Three-People-to-my-Left, My apologies but, when I slid past you to take my theater seat Saturday night, I didn’t recognize you.  I do remember your peach-colored dress.  And that you chatted amicably with the fellow who accompanied you.  But, in all honesty, you looked like any one of a number of theater patrons:  the people […]

Ich bin ein Frïnger

Ich bin ein Frïnger

The 2013 Hollywood Fringe Festival has come and gone.  Well, not exactly gone since a passel of shows are currently being given encore presentations. But you get the idea. So congratulations to all the artists who brought their thing to stage over the past 3 weeks and to all the audiences who became part of […]

Fringe Review: MisShapen

Fringe Review: MisShapen

The very first way an audience experiences a production is through its title and MisShapen may be the best title I’ve seen at this year’s Hollywood Fringe Festival.  It’s compact, smart, and immediately gets across what the show is about: women’s body images.  The production’s poster reinforces this idea and expands upon it by reminding […]

Fringe Review:  25 plays per hour

Fringe Review: 25 plays per hour

It’s kind of a fun fact that 60 miles per hour means you are traveling an entire mile in a minute.  Or 88 feet per second.  In baseball terms, that means you could reach home plate from third base in a single second! These are my thoughts when I travel on LA freeways (wishing I […]

Fringe Review:  The Boneyard & Talisman

Fringe Review: The Boneyard & Talisman

Los Angeles is in ruins.  Police helicopters hover over the city.  The homeless are everywhere. No, Timothy McNeil’s latest play and Hollywood Fringe Festival offering, The Boneyard & Talisman, isn’t set in the present, but rather in a post-apocalyptic near future.   This is not your typical last-human-on-planet-mutated-zombies-coming-to-get-you-Snake-Plissken-saves-the-day post-apcalypse, however.  In fact, few details are given […]

Fringe Review:  [title of show]

Fringe Review: [title of show]

Today, the Bard’s “All the world’s a stage” has been effectively reversed to “The stage is all the world.”   From Luigi Pirandello’s Six Characters in Search of an Author to Jerry Seinfeld and Larry Davis’ “show about nothing” to Charlie Kauffman’s Synecdoche, New York to the myriad of “unscripted” reality television shows, the post-modern urge […]

Fringe Review: Orwellian

Fringe Review: Orwellian

I first saw Larry Cedar solo onstage in American Fiesta and similarly delighted in his work with director Thomas Bigley as the titular character in King Lear.   This team now reunites (with assistance from Nick Neidorf who provides original music and sound design) to create Orwellian, a production that dramatizes three of George Orwell’s most famous […]

New Yorker cover

The Other Los Angeles Fringe Theater

Unless you are one of 7 Native Angelenos in my audience (i.e. from the Tongva tribe), odds are you’ve heard this from friends and family: It’s such a long trip to go out to the West Coast, why don’t you come visit us here in the East? As if the direction of travel changes the […]

Shock Heard ’Round the World

Shock Heard ’Round the World

One of the first things they tell you in Acting 101 is this: Never judge a role. Meaning: no realistically written character ever does anything simply because he is “evil.” Oh, sure, you and I may decide a character’s behavior was horrible, awful, or morally depraved. But to the character? The behavior is always justified, […]

Thumbs Up - Roger Ebert

Me and Ebert and the Movies

Once upon a time there was no Internet.  That meant you were stuck with movie reviews printed in your local newspaper or what you could catch on that now-ancient medium of television.  Local newspaper?  The Hartford Courant.  Hartford doesn’t inspire a lot of art.  In fact, despite Mark Twain’s living there for 17 years, nearly […]

But What About the Beach House?

But What About the Beach House?

If the corner at Hollywood and Highland is blocked off for a full week – artificially snarling traffic that needs no additional help – it must be that time of year when a young actor’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love. Love of a 13½ inch, 8½ pound gold-plated statue, that is. For most denizens of […]

Woman Writing - painting by Picasso

10 Things I Try to Remember While Writing

0.   Trust. 1.    It’s not a blank page; it’s a clean slate. 2.    If you can’t play like a child, you can’t create like an adult. 3.    Always work with your muse. But also work without her. 4.    The audience is not that patient. 5.    Structure is for the audience’s unconscious […]

Goofus and Gallant - Highlights magazine

Where I Found the Toothbrush

Anyone else remember Highlights for Children magazine?  Even at age 7, I was kind of offended by its “Fun with a Purpose” tag on every cover.  That’s the type of slogan adults will recite to prep you for the “sex is for procreation” line they’ll foist on you a few years down the road. Highlights […]

Original G.I. Joe with Kung-Fu grip figure boxes

Word

When you’re a wee tyke, the waning days of December give you the same melancholy feeling that adults have on January 1:  You’re in the middle of a toy hangover.  The adrenaline rush of anticipating the toy cornucopia which began just after Thanksgiving (in today’s world: Labor Day) has burned out and the realization has […]

Santa Claus

Secret Santa

As a small boy, I found the time of year between Thanksgiving and Christmas fairly stressful.  It was quite a burden to be a Jewish child in the middle of my very waspy hometown.  It wasn’t that I was jealous of the encroaching promise of Christmas’ booty of plastic toys from some Far East country […]

The Joker - Jack Nicholson

When They Can’t Take A Joke

There’s an old techie joke — did I just lose half of you? — about a pair of balloonists who are caught in some bad weather and have to make an emergency landing somewhere in Washington state.  Fortunately, they are able to touch down safely in a wide field.  Completely disoriented and not knowing their […]

Rudolph and Hermie - RankinBass Productions

Don’t Need A Santa Claus To Know Which Way The Nose Glows

So, it’s September in Los Angeles and the decorations in the stores remind me that Christmas is just around the corner.  That most magical time of year; I love everything about it.  Well, almost everything.  I’ve always been troubled by one particular Christmas carol I first learned at age 4:  Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. You […]

kid with megaphone

Where’s Your Digital Barbaric YAWP?

“Why do I need a smartphone?  I’ve lived all my life without one.” “It’s true, Ma.  You don’t need a smartphone.  People went thousands of years without them.  People also went thousands of years without indoor plumbing.” Some days it seems like it’s easier to update computers than mothers. Perhaps you know a Luddite – […]

Man in Empty Theater

Response to Steve Julian: A View from a Primitive

In a recent editorial, playwright Steve Julian makes the bold claim that live theater in Los Angeles is in trouble because today’s audience is desensitized.  The thesis goes something like this:  Back in the “golden age” – pre-television – it was far easier to show the audience something new.  With news stories now bathing us […]